My Family - My Family Tree

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I have been able to trace my Murtagh ancestry back to the 1820's.  Within different generations, Murtagh's have joined with Harrington's, Bradley's and Taaffe's over the course of nearly two centuries creating my parents, grandparents, great grandparents and great, great grandparents.

 
 
 
In July 1948, Thomas Murtagh and Mary Carmel Harrington married in St Michael's Church, Inchicore, Dublin.  Their relationship and subsequent children born from the marriage created a family connection between the Murtagh's and the Harrington's that has lasted for over 65 years.  Thomas and Mary Carmel Harrington were my parents and because of them, family exist today in Ireland and in places around the world. 
 
 
 
In September 1912, Daniel Harrington and Mary Ellen Byrne married in St Mary's Church, Lucan, Dublin.  Their relationship and subsequent children born from the marriage created a family connection between the Byrne's, the Harrington's and later the Murtagh's has lasted for over 100 years.  Daniel and Mary Ellen Harrington were my grandparents and because of them, first, second and third cousins exist today in Ireland and around the world. 
 
 
 
In February 1865, William Murtagh and Margaret Taaffe married in Kells, County Meath.  Their relationship and subsequent children born from the marriage created a family connection between the Murtagh's and the Taaffe's that has lasted for nearly 150 years.  William and Margaret Murtagh were my great grandparents and because of them, third and fourth cousins exist today in Ireland and around the world as far as Australia.
 
 
 
In September 1897, Thomas Murtagh and Sarah T Bradley married in St Michael's & John Church, Dublin.  Their relationship and subsequent children born from the marriage created a family connection between the Murtagh's and the Bradleys that has lasted for nearly 120 years.  Thomas and Sarah T Murtagh were my grandparents and because of them, second and third cousins exist today in Ireland and possibly throughout the world. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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